Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Wonky Charm Baby Quilt WIP (With Tutorial)

Tis' the season for baby showers round here! So I'm busy working up some fun pint size, welcome-to-the-world kind of quilts. I have to admit I love me some baby quilts! There are so fast and fun and don't break the bank fabric wise. They are also a great way to improve your FMQ skills because you have a much easier size quilt to mangle through your domestic machine throat space. 

This is the cutie I've been working on this week: I'm calling the design 'Wonky Charm' although this particular quilt will probably be named something a bit more fishy and cute. 


I'm including a tutorial for this quilt. I took lots of notes and lots of pictures as I worked with that end in mind.  But here is my disclaimer: at one point I'm going to leave you alone and let you swim on your own.  (Did you like that fish reference?) In other words, when we get to the wonky part, everybody has to find their own wonky.  I'll give you some tips on how I did my wonky block but like all quilting wonkiness, it's not a precise thing - thus the moniker 'wonky'. So with that in mind, here we go!

What you will need:
5 charm squares or 5- 5 inch squares fussy cut from some adorable fabric (see goldfish bowls)
I've been hoarding this half yard for a few years and there was no selvage identifier so I don't have a clue who made it. 

3/4 yard solid fabric
5/6 yard (30 inches) coordinating fabric
1 1/2 yards backing fabric
1/3 yard binding fabric (see note below)

This is Kona cotton orange, 'Two by Two' by Beth Logan for Henry Glass, and a Riley Blake Ombre Dots. 

Cutting instructions:
Trim the solid and coordinating fabric to 42 inches wide.

From the solid cut 4- 2.5 inch strips.  Take 2 of the strips and sub cut at 28.5 inches.
Cut 1 - 3 inch strip
Sub-cut the 3 inch strips into 4 - 5 in pieces and 1 - 9 inch piece.
From your scraps cut 2 - 2x5 pieces and 2 - 2x8.5 pieces.
You should have a large strip of fabric left, roughly 14 x 42. You'll use this to make your wonky block.

From the coordinating fabric (dots in my case) Trim piece to 29 by 42.  Then cut at 19 inches leaving you with one 19x42 piece and one 10x42 piece.

From the backing cut 2 - 2.5 inch strips. Trim to 42 inches wide.

From the binding fabric cut 4- 2.5 inch strips.

*Note*  It's going to take slightly more than 4 strips to bind this quilt. You can add in some leftover pieces from your solid as you should have plenty left from your wonky block. Or if you don't prefer a scrappy binding you can increase the yardage requirement on this to 1/2 and cut 5 strips.  I am using my solid as my binding so I will have enough left from my wonky block.

Assembly:
Chain piece a 3x5 solid piece to the left side of each of 4 charm squares.

Press seams to solid and then join units together until you have a long strip.  Sew a 2.5 x 28.5 inch strip to the top and bottom of this unit, pressing seams to the solid.


Taking the fifth charm, sew a 2x5 inch solid piece to the top and bottom. Press to solid. Then add the 2x8.5 inch pieces to left and right side. Your charm should now be framed in solid. This gives you some insurance that no matter how your wonky block turns out, you won't be cutting Mr. Goldfish when you go to trim it to size.  You can leave this step out if you prefer and are confident of your wonky skills.

At this point you are going to use your remaining fabric to create a wonky angle block.  I started with what I wanted my angle to be, made my first cut and seam and went from there.

You should have plenty of fabric to play with and create an interesting and unique block.  The only goal here is to end up with a block that measures 9x12.

Once you add the remaining 3 x 9 inch strip to the left side, you will join this amazing block to the rest of the boring ones. You completed unit should measure 42 inches by 9 inches.


Now sew a 2.5 inch strip of backing fabric to the top and bottom of this unit, followed by a 2.5 inch strip of solid.


Final steps! Sew your 10x42 piece of coordinating (dots) fabric to the top  and your 19x42 piece to the bottom.



Sandwich with remaining backing fabric, quilt and bind. Come back on Friday for a peek at the quilted and bound final product!

Linking to WIP Wednesday at Freshly Pieced and
Let's Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts

16 comments:

  1. I love the orange dots, and that little bit of wonk really makes the quilt.

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    1. Thanks Lisa. I've been saving these orange dots for a while. And saving the goldfish. And once day it hit me that there were orange dots on the goldfish fabric!! Eureka! And yes, a little bit of wonk is good for the soul, isn't it?

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  2. Cute baby quilt, nice gender-neutral palette. Thanks for the tutorial.

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    1. Thank you. I don't tend to have a lot of girly prints. This quilt is intended for a baby girl but I think you are right, it is pretty gender neutral.

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  3. Lovely baby quilt! Thank you for the tutorial!

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    1. You're quite welcome. Thanks for visiting.

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  4. Visiting from Let's Bee Social. I love this quilt! I'm always stumped when it comes time to make a baby quilt - and this is perfect. Great use of blocks of fabric, fussy cutting, and color. Wow.

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    1. I love baby quilts. They always seem so much more manageable that tackling design on a big quilt. Plus I can always experiment without worrying about wasting tons of fabric or not having enough to finish. I'm glad you liked it.

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  5. I love this quilt design -- it's simple and should come together quickly, but very stricking as well. I just learned over the weekend that a friend is pregnant, so I may get a chance to use it soon!

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    1. If you run into any trouble following my instructions please give a holler. Thanks for stopping by.

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  6. cute! That's a great way to showcase some special prints ~ must remember this...

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    1. Yep! Break out that darling stuff you've been saving. Nice to have you visit my little blog again!

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  7. That turned out super cute! The wonky block totally makes it!!

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    1. Thanks Christa! Gotta make it wonky modern!

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  8. What a fun quilt! And a great tutorial. Thanks for taking the time to do that while you were working.

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    1. Thanks. I won't lie, some of the math just about killed me since I was trying to be really precise. But it all worked out in the end. I feel a little bad that I didn't do more specific instructions on the wonky part but at least I warned everybody in the beginning, right? :)

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Thanks so much for leaving a comment. Getting feedback and hearing from other quilters makes my day!